Pinus mugo of bergden

Or mountain pine Pinus mugo is mainly planted in rock gardens.
mountain pine

Pinus mugo (Bot.)
Dwarf mountain pine, Swiss pine mountainp (Eng.)
Pin de montagne (French)
Kiefer-Berg, Berg Föhre, Latschenkiefer, Krummholz (German)
Pinaceae – pine family

 

The mountain pine is a shrub with many stems or a curved horizontal to 25 m high tree with a conical crown. It derives its name from the fact that he is native to mountainous regions of southern and central Europe. In the lowlands, he, except in some heathlands, wild rare. In alpine areas grows to 2400 m with large populations of the tree line. He is highly resistant to wind and frost and can be 800 years old. He belongs to the protected crops.

Because of its broad and rich branched root system, he loose earth and stones down. He is therefore happy in the mountains planted with erosion and avalanche danger.

In northern Germany and Denmark one uses mountain pines for the confirmation of nutrient-poor dunes and heath to be planted.

plant Characteristics

Like the pine stand in the mountain pine needles in pairs in a sheath on the short shoots. They are 3-6 cm country, hard, stiff, usually blunt and dark. They are closer together than the pine. Its flowers are longer and slimmer. The cones are up to 4 together in whorls. They are oval and shiny brown. The bark is gray-brown to black, gray and scaly.

 

pitch

The mountain pine found in high moors, on rocky hills and rocky slopes. It is found in alpine areas of Central Europe and the Balkans, along the Pyrenees to the Carpathians and the Fichtelgebirge in Germany.

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