Pinus nigra zwarte

Black pine Pinus nigra or a fast-growing conifer
black Den

Pinus nigra (Bot.)
Austrian pine (Eng.)
Pin noir (French)
Schwarz Kiefer (German)
Pineaceae – Pine family

The black pine is a fast-growing conifers that are 40 meters high. In mature stands, he is impressive and picturesque with its screen-like crown.

distribution

The black pine is found in Central and Southern Europe, the Balkans and Asia Minor. With us it is planted as an ornamental and forest trees. The black pine has several subspecies, e.g. the ‘Austrian pine’ needles with very dark, and “Corsican pine” with lighter colored and less dense needles and a lighter bark. All are mountain trees.

On dry, hot and calcareous sites plays an important role because it has resistance to extreme weather conditions, except frost.

plant Characteristics

The needles are in pairs close together on the short shoots and are 8 to 16 inches long. They are stiff, dark and piercing. The female flowers resemble those of the Pine. The male flowers are slightly larger. Flowering occurs in May and June.

The cones are 4-9 cm long. The cone scales are wider than other pines and has a greenish yellow “shield” and a yellowish transition to their ‘feet’.

They are slightly shiny and ocher. The dekschubben have navels with short thorns. The seeds in the autumn of the second year maturity. To make them fall, spread the seed scales are widely divergent. Then the pins are in their entirety.

The bark is gray-brown to black, later rough and fissured scaly.

se

The wood is full of black pine resin and is therefore not suitable for woodworking. It is a decorative tree and suitable for planting in gardens, cemeteries and parks.

pitch

Of all the black pine is the most wind resistant. It can therefore tolerate an open stand. He prefers an alkaline soil. It is preferably in partial shade.

 

types

There are different varieties of small residual pines suitable for the rock garden or keep in a container on the balcony.

 

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